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Clorox Taps Simulmedia And IRI To Determine How TV Drives Sales

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grpSimulmedia has sweetened its targeting capabilities for TV buyers.

Through a strategic deal with consumer market research and retail analytics firm IRI, revealed Wednesday, marketers can now target their linear TV ads based on predictive purchase segments called IRI ProScores.

These segments determine consumers’ likelihood to purchase based on different propensities.

This is the first time IRI’s consumer purchase segments can be activated on TV, said Srishti Gupta, president of IRI’s Media Center for Excellence.

“We’re enabling a direct household-to-household match to national, linear television viewing data through Simulmedia, so [marketers can see] not only which shows are being watched, but what are the products most likely to be purchased,” Gupta said.

The Clorox Co. is one of the early testers of the partnership. The brand already applies IRI data in its marketing mix models, said Chris Neel, Clorox’s group manager for media, so it made sense to apply IRI to TV segments.

Clorox has found IRI data applies more universally to its products, Neel said. “[Other] shopper segments tend to be more heavily weighted to grocery, whereas we have a lot of products that fall outside of that category.” 

And although Simulmedia has integrations to other shopper data partners like Nielsen Buyer Insights, which also combines panel and purchase data, IRI ProScores claims it offers unique insights into shopper affinities.

Because Simulmedia captures second-by-second viewing data, the goal is to merge purchase and viewing information in real time. Clorox specifically wants to understand how TV drives incremental sales – and will figure that out using lift studies.

The brand will also use Simulmedia/IRI to figure out which shows its audience watches and at what frequency.

“It’s allowing us to better identify programming on a national basis that has the propensity to reach our defined targeting sets,” Neel said. “Using data to perform direct matches creates more consistency in our buys versus piecing things together using lookalike models.”

TV used to be bought contextually (e.g., a planner would buy based on program ratings or broad demos). As more networks develop their own version of audience-based indexing, Clorox likes that Simulmedia is network agnostic.

In other words, its system isn’t limited to a single inventory source.

Simulmedia provides a direct match back to a sample of 7 million households across multiple MVPDs in 190 markets – all based on the US Census, according to Simulmedia President and CRO Tim Spengler.

“For mass brands, there hasn’t been enough targeting precision at the national level,” Spengler said. “In addressable TV, you can apply data, but it’s not mass reach. It’s not for mass brands. This is about moving the business of TV from proxies like GRPs and demographics to real metrics and currencies.“


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Gartner Digital Marketing Hub Quadrant: The Big Get Bigger

Clorox Taps Simulmedia And IRI To Determine How TV Drives Sales

4 Things To Know As Out-Of-Home Goes Programmatic

Outgoing FTC Consumer Privacy Czar On Why The Ecosystem Has a Privacy Problem

How Conagra Kicks Low-Quality Impressions To The Curb

Publicis Writes Down Digital Agency Group By Roughly $1.5 Billion

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Programmatic Spend At Omnicom Continues To Grow And Diversify

Cannes Lions Owner Ascential To Acquire MediaLink

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4 Things To Know As Out-Of-Home Goes Programmatic

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Times Square NYC

 

Billboards are lighting up with the promise of programmatic.

Out-of-home (OOH) is projected to grow almost 12% in spend by 2020 – faster than any other traditional media – thanks to opportunities in digital, according to the Outdoor Advertising Association of America. Digital OOH accounted for $2.7 billion in ad spend in the US last year.

As digital inventory grows, OOH media sellers are eyeing programmatic budgets. US sellers like Clear Channel Outdoor, Lamar and Outfront Media are building platforms or partnering with vendors to allow for programmatic buying and targeting on their digital inventory.

Digital buyers are waking up to the OOH opportunity.

Forty-nine percent of media planners placed digital OOH on their plans in the past year, according to a survey by the Digital Place Based Advertising Association (DPAA) and JAM Research LLC. That number jumps above 69% when OOH is combined with mobile for retargeting, measurement and dynamic creative.

And the infrastructure is growing: Broadsign launched the first programmatic OOH exchange more than a decade ago in Canada. Vistar Media, launched in 2012, houses 90% of US digital OOH inventory. Both are used to automate buys on unsold inventory.

In January, Clear Channel launched a private marketplace (PMP) with Rubicon Project, opening inventory on almost 1,000 digital boards to programmatic through real-time bidding (RTB) pipes. Outfront is building a supply-side platform, and Lamar is exploring both options.

But only 39% of planners know it’s possible to buy digital OOH programmatically.

“In the US, clients are interested, but not asking for programmatic OOH by name,” said David Krupp, CEO of WPP’s OOH agency, Kinetic.

Programmatic has the potential to have the same impact on OOH as it has had on digital advertising. But digital OOH isn’t the same as programmatic OOH. Here are four things to know.

1. Digital OOH Doesn’t Mean Programmatic OOH

Traditionally, digital OOH inventory is sold as “spots” in a “loop,” or a scheduled list of recurring ads, on an IO basis. But to play in digital, OOH media sellers have had to convert to the CPM.

“Buyers didn’t want a separate industry pricing model,” said Wade Rifkin, SVP of programmatic at Clear Channel Outdoor. “They wanted a CPM-based, general auction mechanic that’s parallel to what they’re used to transacting against.”

But in OOH, one bid request garners multiple impressions, making it difficult to compare pricing with digital. While sellers can estimate foot traffic near a certain board, it’s impossible to know exactly how many people will actually look at the board while an ad is running.

The DPAA and Prohaska Consulting are developing standards that build on the IAB’s OpenRTB 2.4 protocol to help OOH media sellers value their programmatic inventory against digital buys.

But it’s still early days.

“What’s a 14×48 foot digital screen on the side of 11th Avenue [in Manhattan] worth relative to a banner on my phone that’s barely a quarter inch tall?” said Andy Sriubas, executive vice president at Outfront Media. “We have to figure out how you get to that.” 

2. There’s Little RTB In Programmatic OOH

Programmatic, as it applies to OOH, is mostly programmatic guaranteed, where inventory is reserved and purchased in an automated fashion.

Auctions are difficult to execute because supply still outweighs demand, said Vistar’s director of marketing and analytics, Jillian Kushner.

Clear Channel’s partnership with Rubicon is the closest development to a real-time OOH auction. Clear Channel sells its programmatic-oohinventory via RTB pipes in Rubicon’s PMP. But the transaction happens within 60 seconds of availability, making it “near real-time,” Rifkin said.

Some OOH executives worry that opening inventory to RTB will commoditize value and create a race to the bottom like it did in digital. But unlike digital, OOH has finite inventory and there’s no ceiling on price.

“OOH has not yet gotten into RTB and a race to the bottom – nor do we think it should,” said Kinetic’s Krupp. “OOH is physical real estate and there is a value and a limited amount of premium placements, keeping costs stable.”

Others think a guaranteed approach makes more sense until demand grows to match supply.

“Workflow automation is the key,” said Outfront’s Sriubas. “It’s about accessing our inventory in real time and being able to buy it on an exchange.”

When it comes time to serve the ad, some lag time is necessary to pre-cache and load the creative, as creative formats are heavier than digital or mobile banners.

And unlike digital, OOH targets many consumers rather than just one. Think about a roadside billboard changing creative every time someone drives by, Kushner said.

“It would look like the billboard is having a seizure,” she said.

. Mobile Location Data Makes Programmatic OOH Measureable

In digital, buyers follow cookies or device IDs to target an individual. In OOH, buyers follow the movement patterns of aggregate groups of people along their daily routines to target a mass audience.

As such, mobile location data is critical for planning, targeting and measurement in OOH. All media sellers, buyers and vendors AdExchanger spoke with are leveraging mobile location data to measure OOH media.

Media sellers share their log data with location data companies like Placed, which can measure an impression by matching the location of their opted-in consumers to the time an ad ran on a particular board.

“If we have a large location data set that describes consumer movement partners, we can use physical-world signals like entering sports arenas or bars to create a behavioral proxy to describe a consumer,” Kushner said.

These movement patterns can also help buyers create smarter media plans.

By looking at location data in aggregate, buyers can see, for example, which consumers visit Starbucks every morning before work. If that buyer’s client is Dunkin Donuts, he or she can create a media plan based on those movement patterns to put ads in front of Starbucks customers.

“Now I know where I want to put my boards,” said David Shim, CEO of Placed, which tracks the location of roughly 2.5 million opted-in US consumers on mobile.  “I’m reverse engineering that not to reach that individual person, but to almost build a lookalike.”

To retarget consumers on mobile, media sellers can geofence their boards to send a follow-up or action-oriented message to a consumer. Clear Channel has been retargeting users on mobile through its Radar program since early last year.

“We score the boards in advance against demo and behavioral signals to make sure the [advertiser] gets the audience they’re going after,” Rifkin said. “Then we create a deal ID, push that to the DSP and the campaign can start buying.”

In programmatic, DSPs can continue that cross-channel messaging to desktop and beyond.

“Ad tech players [can] stretch that narrative beyond OOH by using some of the data we’re able to pass through in our bid requests about the location of the board,” Rifkin said.

With location data and mobile retargeting, marketers can measure attribution for digital OOH buys by matching an impression to their CRM files to see if the ad drove a purchase in-store.

“We’re mapping exposure to store visits and differentiating between someone who is walking by a store, going into a store or in front of the store,” Shim said. “People need to justify why they’re spending time and resources on this, why they’re paying higher premiums for programmatic.”

But OOH attribution isn’t perfect, said Clare-Marie Panno, SVP director of insight at Dentsu Aegis‘ OOH agency Posterscope USA. While sellers can make smart estimates, it’s impossible to know that a person standing in front of a digital board actually saw the ad on display at the exact time it ran, or if they were just nearby.

“We’re getting closer, but we haven’t really cracked the code on that one yet,” she said.

4. Third-Party Data Lights Up Dynamic Creative In OOH

Third-party data like weather and traffic triggers make OOH a canvas for dynamic creative.

In Turkey, programmatic OOH exchange AirSqreen and OOH media seller Look!Screens facilitated the country’s first programmatic OOH campaign for six Unilever brands, including ice creambaywatch_snowsucks-hed-2017 brand Algida and ready-made soup brand Knorr, that dynamically served creative based on weather triggers in Istanbul.

“We targeted meal preparation times,” said Taylan Koru, digital director for Unilever at Mindshare Turkey. “[People drink] soup in cold weather, so we targeted people when it was below 5 degrees Celsius.”

For Turkey’s brand of Axe deodorant, AirSqreen will use data from an events company to trigger creative based on nightlife opportunities in Istanbul. Similarly, for Clear deodorant, a different creative will be rendered in real time every time the score goes up in a football match.

US media seller Lamar ran a campaign for Paramount Pictures’ “Baywatch” revamp that similarly triggered different creative images based on the weather.

It’s a game-changer for the OOH industry, which was born in the world of static posters and billboards.

“Advertisers can say, ‘I only want to advertise this creative after 4 p.m., if it’s raining and if the home team won that day,” Sriubas said. “It’s a spectacularly different way to think about OOH.”


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1 Comment

  1. Brenda

    It’s great to see how OOH is adapting and evolving to meet the changing digital landscape. Particular kudos to the companies mentioned under your 4th point who go to the next level and use real-time events to trigger highly relevant advertising. It’s also particularly interesting how they are now using movement patterns to develop buyer personas, or lookalike buyers. Great article, thanks!

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Outgoing FTC Consumer Privacy Czar On Why The Ecosystem Has a Privacy Problem

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The ad tech ecosystem keeps Jessica Rich up at night.

“The current models just aren’t working,” said Rich, who until recently sat on the front lines of advertising regulation and enforcement as director of the Federal Trade Commission’s Bureau of Consumer Protection.

Rich resigned her post last week after a 26-year career at the commission spanning the dawn of personal computing to the ubiquity of smartphones.

She leaves a long legacy behind her, having built the FTC’s privacy program in the early 1990s, helped develop the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, founded what became the FTC’s Office of Technology and Research Investigations, populated the commission with tech-savvy staff and brought enforcement actions as bureau chief that led to around $14 billion in fines against everyone from Amazon and Apple to Vizio and Volkswagen.

Rich still isn’t sure what her next move will be, but it will definitely involve consumer protection and/or privacy.

The problem is that privacy policies usually do more to obscure that to educate and only a glutton for punishment – or a lawyer – is likely to read through to the end with any level of understanding.

“You could spend your whole day reading privacy policies if you want to and it wouldn’t work, because even if you tried, you wouldn’t know most of the companies that are collecting your data,” Rich said.

That puts a serious kink in the notion of notice and choice.

“We need tools that will truly drive the marketplace,” Rich said. “That was the idea behind Do Not Track. I know Do Not Track was a failed effort, but the goal was good: to try and make it easier for consumers to make choices.”

The ad industry reacted to Do Not Track in much the same way as it’s reacting to ad blockers – as a threat.

“If you can just toggle something and turn off a whole lot of activity, it’s a lot easier for consumers,” Rich said. “But it also shuts down some of the activity that a lot of businesses want to engage in.”

And the activity that businesses engage in – data collection and data-driven advertising – often funds the activities that consumers want to engage in.

Which begs the age-old question: Do consumers actually care about their privacy?

“I’m not sure we’ll ever get a definitive answer,” Rich said. “In all of the surveys, consumers say, ‘Oh, we care about our privacy,’ and then they constantly seem to make choices that suggest they don’t.”

The disparity between statement and action exists because it’s so difficult for consumers to exercise choice or, as Rich put it, “to vote with their feet.”

It’s “ridiculous” to expect consumers to manage their privacy by asking them to stop and read a privacy policy every time they want to take an action, and it’s especially ridiculous to ask it of them in a mobile environment “where there are devices everywhere collecting data from you,” she said.

But when consumers are presented with clearer information and choices, they do react. Social networks are a good example.

“When big companies like Google and Facebook change their privacy policy, we see a huge uproar [and] consumers actively engage with the permissions and settings to control who gets their information,” Rich said.

Consumers will make choices, if those choices are easy to make. Privacy researchers and policymakers are working on tools to make disclosures simpler for consumers, many of which have been explored at the FTC’s annual PrivacyCon event, including machine-readable type policies, universal opt-outs and automated mechanisms that predict preferences and make choices on behalf of consumers.

“Some of this is controversial in that consumers should be able to make choices for themselves,” Rich said. “But the idea of company-by-company disclosures, even if they’re made really brief and better, is becoming insane because there are so many companies collecting data and so many of them are invisible to consumers.”

Invisible and possibly harmful. “Harm” is often the litmus test for an FTC action, and there have been examples of potential harm caused by digital ad tracking without permission, said Rich, pointing to the FTC’s actions against InMobi and Turn.

In InMobi’s case, the mobile ad network was fined for tracking geolocation, including children’s data, without permission. Demand-side platform Turn settled with the FTC for allegedly tracking users with Verizon’s unique identifier header even after they’d opted out.

“If consumers are deceived or tracked against their wishes, that’s harmful – deception is harm,” Rich said. “The marketplace is supposed to be a place where you can make choices.“


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When Video Inventory Is Scarce, Bonnier Turns To Automation

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As the demand for digital video increases, publishers like Bonnier Corp. are turning to automation to beef up their inventory.

With more than 35 special-interest titles, including Field & Stream, Popular Science and Outdoor Life, Bonnier’s editors spend a lot of time on video creation.

Even so, “when it comes to a lot of our URLs, we’re generally sold out on video,” said Sean Holzman, Bonnier’s chief digital revenue officer.

Selling out of inventory is a perennial problem for publishers. For Bonnier, the shortfall becomes especially acute during late Q2 and throughout Q3, when its more outdoorsy-themed magazines get a boost from the weather. Readers of Motorcyclist, Motorcycle Cruiser and Moto Intro, for example, are getting ready for big summer outings on their bikes and they’re watching tons of video.

In turn, Bonnier’s ad partners start asking for video ad inventory – especially pre-roll.

“Scaling video is really important at those times of the year,” Holzman said. “We’re deploying every resource we can and editors are cranking out video. It’s a matter of getting eyeballs to the video so they can convert to new pre-roll impressions.”

To help pump up inventory volume, Bonnier began working with Wibbitz, a text-to-video platform that automates the video creation process. Wibbitz gets paid on a rev-share basis by the publisher.

“For us, video creation is a bandwidth thing,” Holzman said. “Automation tools for producing video content are helpful because the process is time-consuming and needs a lot of resources against it.”

Automation isn’t always the answer, though. While it works well to create companion videos or video versions of list-based articles, some content still needs an editor’s touch.

“If we’re talking about taking a brand-new Harley or Indian out on a test drive, [automation is] not the platform we’re going to use,” Holzman said.

But the more video content Bonnier is able to embed in stories, the more video content it has to monetize. And the more inventory it’s able to monetize, the more viewers it’s able to drive. The result is a virtuous cycle of eyeballs and engagement, Holzman said.

That’s great, but advertisers have specific metrics they’re looking for, and more inventory doesn’t necessarily solve the creative problem.

Bonnier toils to keep its viewability rate at or above the industry’s 70% threshold across measurable impressions, which Holzman referred to as “table stakes” at this point.

But advertisers also care about how much time a viewer spends with their video ad – and that often depends on the ad, not the placement.

“People will watch an ad if it’s interesting, and they’ll bounce if it’s not,” Holzman said.

And that’s a major challenge from both a revenue and editorial perspective, he said.

Bonnier can overindex on delivering high completion rates for its own video content and precise targeting, but it’s not controlling everything the user sees.

“We’re going to do our best to get a high completion rate,” Holzman said. “But it does come down to the audience and the creative, not just the audience.“


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Why Starting With Cookies Doesn’t Make Sense For Cross-Device Tracking

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Are some marketers approaching cross-device backward?

Tom Laband, CEO and co-founder of mobile data marketplace adsquare, thinks so.

“We see many advertisers start with cookie-derived data and bridge that to mobile IDs using cross-device vendors – and to me, that doesn’t make sense,” Laband said Thursday at a company event in New York City.

Device IDs, like IDFA on iOS and Android’s advertising ID, are persistent and often used as the connective tissue to link customer activity and identifiers across devices and channels.

“These are way more persistent than a cookie ID,” Laband said.

But scale is always an issue, and in order to get there, onboarders and cross-device providers are increasingly turning to probabilistic methods to pump up their reach.

“What’s happening now is that [marketers are] taking a desktop cookie and probabilistically connecting it to a mobile user,” said Kathleen Comer, GM of client services at The Trade Desk.

Even if they’re using a cross-device vendor like Tapad, Drawbridge or Oracle’s Crosswise to make the match between a cookie and device ID, the audience that’s being created is essentially a lookalike audience, rather than a one-to-one match to a device ID.

“I think we need more marketers to start using mobile data for mobile campaigns, as opposed to working with the big cookie-focused DMPs out there with fancy cross-device technology that allows the bridging of cookies to mobile devices,” Laband told AdExchanger.

It also makes sense to start with mobile IDs, he said, because the lifetime value of an app identifier is greater than a cookie – even a persistent cookie, which doesn’t expire when users close their browsers, but is at risk of being cleared at any time.

In other words, Laband argued, a more solid strategy would be to coalesce cookie data around a persistent anonymous identifier tied to a device, rather than creating cookie syncs between tracking data across different digital ad platforms – which can lead to data leakage – and then connecting those matched cookies to a mobile ID.

“When you start with a mobile device, there is no cookie syncing or there is less, and then you can use cross-device technology to bridge to cookies,” Laband said. “A profile can be more granular and be more accurate using a mobile ID, and mobile also has data sets that are not available in the cookie world, like location data and telco data.”


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4 Comments

  1. Marcus Brook

    Hmmm, I agree with the sentiment, but probabilistically tying humans to a device or cookie ID kind of got us into this mess in the first place. Throw in the soon to be enacted General Data Protection REgulations here in Europe and this becomes a very shady. Utimately the publisher and the advertiser will have to own the ID of rthe subscriber and customer and should form direct relationship deterministically. That way, 3rd party ad tec doesn’t get in the way, data leakage doesn’t take place and ad perfomance improves. Publishers then get more of the ad spend for their hard work and advertisers get better ROI. It’s why we built Adapptive.

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  2. Henry Blaufox

    Can Mr. Laband explain what impact there is on keying to device ID when the person gets a new device? Phone replacements (upgrades) have been common, about every two years or so, the way US based carriers have promoted the devices, though that cycle may be changing now. In any case, what is the impact on data reliability when the same user gets a new phone (or tablet) for the old? Same user, same phone number, new device ID.

    Reply

    • Ari Saposh

      Hi Henry. I was actually at the event yesterday with Tom. To answer your question, it all comes down to HOW you’re gathering this information. Our company (OneAudience) presented yesterday at the AdSquare show and we explained that we gather this device ID information through our SDK (Software Development Kit). Based on the permissions we have to gather data like this, we are always pinging the device to get the most up-to-date information. So the use case you present where ‚what happens when the user gets a new device?‘ — as most people back up the apps on their phone/tablet, if they restore that back up on their new device, we automatically receive the updated Device ID because our SDK is transferred through the backup. Does that make sense?

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    • tyler pietz

      @henry the impact is virtually the same as when a cookie expires or is cleared from the browser cache; either you successfully drop a new cookie / capture a new id or you don’t. however, device ids are far less fractional and persist for much longer (on average) than browser cookies, meaning ids are significantly more stable

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Gartner Digital Marketing Hub Quadrant: The Big Get Bigger

Clorox Taps Simulmedia And IRI To Determine How TV Drives Sales

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»

4 Things To Know As Out-Of-Home Goes Programmatic

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Times Square NYC

 

Billboards are lighting up with the promise of programmatic.

Out-of-home (OOH) is projected to grow almost 12% in spend by 2020 – faster than any other traditional media – thanks to opportunities in digital, according to the Outdoor Advertising Association of America. Digital OOH accounted for $2.7 billion in ad spend in the US last year.

As digital inventory grows, OOH media sellers are eyeing programmatic budgets. US sellers like Clear Channel Outdoor, Lamar and Outfront Media are building platforms or partnering with vendors to allow for programmatic buying and targeting on their digital inventory.

Digital buyers are waking up to the OOH opportunity.

Forty-nine percent of media planners placed digital OOH on their plans in the past year, according to a survey by the Digital Place Based Advertising Association (DPAA) and JAM Research LLC. That number jumps above 69% when OOH is combined with mobile for retargeting, measurement and dynamic creative.

And the infrastructure is growing: Broadsign launched the first programmatic OOH exchange more than a decade ago in Canada. Vistar Media, launched in 2012, houses 90% of US digital OOH inventory. Both are used to automate buys on unsold inventory.

In January, Clear Channel launched a private marketplace (PMP) with Rubicon Project, opening inventory on almost 1,000 digital boards to programmatic through real-time bidding (RTB) pipes. Outfront is building a supply-side platform, and Lamar is exploring both options.

But only 39% of planners know it’s possible to buy digital OOH programmatically.

“In the US, clients are interested, but not asking for programmatic OOH by name,” said David Krupp, CEO of WPP’s OOH agency, Kinetic.

Programmatic has the potential to have the same impact on OOH as it has had on digital advertising. But digital OOH isn’t the same as programmatic OOH. Here are four things to know.

1. Digital OOH Doesn’t Mean Programmatic OOH

Traditionally, digital OOH inventory is sold as “spots” in a “loop,” or a scheduled list of recurring ads, on an IO basis. But to play in digital, OOH media sellers have had to convert to the CPM.

“Buyers didn’t want a separate industry pricing model,” said Wade Rifkin, SVP of programmatic at Clear Channel Outdoor. “They wanted a CPM-based, general auction mechanic that’s parallel to what they’re used to transacting against.”

But in OOH, one bid request garners multiple impressions, making it difficult to compare pricing with digital. While sellers can estimate foot traffic near a certain board, it’s impossible to know exactly how many people will actually look at the board while an ad is running.

The DPAA and Prohaska Consulting are developing standards that build on the IAB’s OpenRTB 2.4 protocol to help OOH media sellers value their programmatic inventory against digital buys.

But it’s still early days.

“What’s a 14×48 foot digital screen on the side of 11th Avenue [in Manhattan] worth relative to a banner on my phone that’s barely a quarter inch tall?” said Andy Sriubas, executive vice president at Outfront Media. “We have to figure out how you get to that.” 

2. There’s Little RTB In Programmatic OOH

Programmatic, as it applies to OOH, is mostly programmatic guaranteed, where inventory is reserved and purchased in an automated fashion.

Auctions are difficult to execute because supply still outweighs demand, said Vistar’s director of marketing and analytics, Jillian Kushner.

Clear Channel’s partnership with Rubicon is the closest development to a real-time OOH auction. Clear Channel sells its programmatic-oohinventory via RTB pipes in Rubicon’s PMP. But the transaction happens within 60 seconds of availability, making it “near real-time,” Rifkin said.

Some OOH executives worry that opening inventory to RTB will commoditize value and create a race to the bottom like it did in digital. But unlike digital, OOH has finite inventory and there’s no ceiling on price.

“OOH has not yet gotten into RTB and a race to the bottom – nor do we think it should,” said Kinetic’s Krupp. “OOH is physical real estate and there is a value and a limited amount of premium placements, keeping costs stable.”

Others think a guaranteed approach makes more sense until demand grows to match supply.

“Workflow automation is the key,” said Outfront’s Sriubas. “It’s about accessing our inventory in real time and being able to buy it on an exchange.”

When it comes time to serve the ad, some lag time is necessary to pre-cache and load the creative, as creative formats are heavier than digital or mobile banners.

And unlike digital, OOH targets many consumers rather than just one. Think about a roadside billboard changing creative every time someone drives by, Kushner said.

“It would look like the billboard is having a seizure,” she said.

. Mobile Location Data Makes Programmatic OOH Measureable

In digital, buyers follow cookies or device IDs to target an individual. In OOH, buyers follow the movement patterns of aggregate groups of people along their daily routines to target a mass audience.

As such, mobile location data is critical for planning, targeting and measurement in OOH. All media sellers, buyers and vendors AdExchanger spoke with are leveraging mobile location data to measure OOH media.

Media sellers share their log data with location data companies like Placed, which can measure an impression by matching the location of their opted-in consumers to the time an ad ran on a particular board.

“If we have a large location data set that describes consumer movement partners, we can use physical-world signals like entering sports arenas or bars to create a behavioral proxy to describe a consumer,” Kushner said.

These movement patterns can also help buyers create smarter media plans.

By looking at location data in aggregate, buyers can see, for example, which consumers visit Starbucks every morning before work. If that buyer’s client is Dunkin Donuts, he or she can create a media plan based on those movement patterns to put ads in front of Starbucks customers.

“Now I know where I want to put my boards,” said David Shim, CEO of Placed, which tracks the location of roughly 2.5 million opted-in US consumers on mobile.  “I’m reverse engineering that not to reach that individual person, but to almost build a lookalike.”

To retarget consumers on mobile, media sellers can geofence their boards to send a follow-up or action-oriented message to a consumer. Clear Channel has been retargeting users on mobile through its Radar program since early last year.

“We score the boards in advance against demo and behavioral signals to make sure the [advertiser] gets the audience they’re going after,” Rifkin said. “Then we create a deal ID, push that to the DSP and the campaign can start buying.”

In programmatic, DSPs can continue that cross-channel messaging to desktop and beyond.

“Ad tech players [can] stretch that narrative beyond OOH by using some of the data we’re able to pass through in our bid requests about the location of the board,” Rifkin said.

With location data and mobile retargeting, marketers can measure attribution for digital OOH buys by matching an impression to their CRM files to see if the ad drove a purchase in-store.

“We’re mapping exposure to store visits and differentiating between someone who is walking by a store, going into a store or in front of the store,” Shim said. “People need to justify why they’re spending time and resources on this, why they’re paying higher premiums for programmatic.”

But OOH attribution isn’t perfect, said Clare-Marie Panno, SVP director of insight at Dentsu Aegis‘ OOH agency Posterscope USA. While sellers can make smart estimates, it’s impossible to know that a person standing in front of a digital board actually saw the ad on display at the exact time it ran, or if they were just nearby.

“We’re getting closer, but we haven’t really cracked the code on that one yet,” she said.

4. Third-Party Data Lights Up Dynamic Creative In OOH

Third-party data like weather and traffic triggers make OOH a canvas for dynamic creative.

In Turkey, programmatic OOH exchange AirSqreen and OOH media seller Look!Screens facilitated the country’s first programmatic OOH campaign for six Unilever brands, including ice creambaywatch_snowsucks-hed-2017 brand Algida and ready-made soup brand Knorr, that dynamically served creative based on weather triggers in Istanbul.

“We targeted meal preparation times,” said Taylan Koru, digital director for Unilever at Mindshare Turkey. “[People drink] soup in cold weather, so we targeted people when it was below 5 degrees Celsius.”

For Turkey’s brand of Axe deodorant, AirSqreen will use data from an events company to trigger creative based on nightlife opportunities in Istanbul. Similarly, for Clear deodorant, a different creative will be rendered in real time every time the score goes up in a football match.

US media seller Lamar ran a campaign for Paramount Pictures’ “Baywatch” revamp that similarly triggered different creative images based on the weather.

It’s a game-changer for the OOH industry, which was born in the world of static posters and billboards.

“Advertisers can say, ‘I only want to advertise this creative after 4 p.m., if it’s raining and if the home team won that day,” Sriubas said. “It’s a spectacularly different way to think about OOH.”


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1 Comment

  1. Brenda

    It’s great to see how OOH is adapting and evolving to meet the changing digital landscape. Particular kudos to the companies mentioned under your 4th point who go to the next level and use real-time events to trigger highly relevant advertising. It’s also particularly interesting how they are now using movement patterns to develop buyer personas, or lookalike buyers. Great article, thanks!

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Bloomberg Uses Programmatic Creative To Boost Ad Relevance

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When Bloomberg writes a story about a public company or commodity, it’s bringing market information dynamically into the adjacent ad.

Bloomberg is packaging up this programmatic creative as a new ad unit, which it’s calling DataLock.

Bank of Montreal and the Chicago Mercantile Exchange Group this quarter agreed to be the first advertisers to use it.

DataLock is designed to reduce banner blindness since it provides financial information of interest to Bloomberg’s readers in the right rail, an area users often ignore.

And the ad unit showcases how Bloomberg’s data can create better ad experiences for consumers.

“We wanted to highlight the power of Bloomberg data and how that data could be married with an advertiser’s message to drive relevance,” said Derek Gatts, Bloomberg’s global head of ad trafficking, technology and product.

Plus, Bloomberg does all the work on behalf of the advertiser. “One of the challenges with programmatic creative is that it’s a burden on the advertisers to build those creative variations. We have those variations built in automatically,” Gatts added.

Bloomberg uses machine learning to dynamically pull the correct company’s information into the ad. A proprietary personalization algorithm ranks companies to determine if Tesla, for example, is the most relevant company in the article.

Because Bloomberg already had these machine learning capabilities in place to power other parts of its site, the team created the new ad product in about a month.

“One of the priorities we had was to come up with ideas we could get into the market quickly that worked with our unique assets in terms of pipes, data and APIs,” said Michael Shane, Bloomberg’s global head of digital innovation, who helps facilitate collaboration between editorial and advertising.

The stock information runs in a 300×600 IAB standard unit on Bloomberg’s redesigned desktop experience. Launched in October, the website template brings content back to the right rail.

Videos run in the right rail, for example, as well as high-impact ads. In the case of DataLock, the ad provides content – a stock price – along with a brand message.

“We can’t effectively do an ad like this if we didn’t prioritize having a clean user experience,” Gatts said. “We removed the noise from the right rail. We allow for multiple ads to roll with you, but it’s not a noisy experience.”

DataLock isn’t Bloomberg’s first effort to merge its content with its advertising.

In August, it rolled out B:Pop, an ad product which paired a content recommendation with an advertiser’s message. Since Bloomberg has invested both in data and in APIs to make that data readily available, Gatts and Shane expect to roll out more data-driven ad products.

“This is the first step down a path of ‘altered relevance,’” Gatts said, or using personalization to make content and ads more relevant to the user seeing that ad.

In the meantime, it will try to attract more advertisers to the product and work at rolling out DataLock on mobile. Bloomberg also wants to offer the unit programmatically via automated guaranteed deals. But in the meantime, it’s only selling the ads directly and on Bloomberg properties.

“Long term, my goal is for advertisers to look at Bloomberg as a platform with data and APIs that can create an interesting, dynamic ad experience, whether it’s programmatic or totally custom,” Shane said.

 

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DataLock creative in action

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Gartner Digital Marketing Hub Quadrant: The Big Get Bigger

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magic quadrant digital hubAcquisitions and more mature integrations led Oracle, Adobe and Salesforce to separate sharply from their peers in Gartner’s third Digital Marketing Hub Magic Quadrant, released late Wednesday.

Of course, it’s questionable whether ad tech vendors, such as DataXu or Cxense, really qualify as “peers,” but Gartner has had a unique, if controversial, way of assessing the vendor landscape.

“There’s an area of overlap that has to do with identity management and analytics and operational data that makes it useful to look at them in the context of a comparative framework,” said Andrew Frank, the Gartner VP who co-authored the study. “That’s not to say they’re all doing the same thing, but there’s still a point of convergence.”

Gartner defined digital marketing hubs as solutions that can combine first-, second- and third-party data across known and anonymous consumers. The hubs also have collaboration and workflow management capabilities, can sequence and coordinate messages across channels and measure outcomes.

Gartner placed Oracle, Salesforce, Adobe and Marketo in the leader category since they could execute and had “completeness of vision,” a rating that includes evaluations around product strategies, innovation, business models and market understanding, among other criteria.

Neustar, IgnitionOne, Zeta Global, Kitewheel and Sitecore landed in the visionaries category. These companies, according to Gartner, didn’t have the best ability to execute, but had good “completeness of vision.”

The challenger category included IBM, Nielsen, MediaMath, DataXu, Turn, Lotame – companies that could execute but lacked “completeness of vision.”

And the niche players include Cxense, BlueConic, SAS, RedPoint, SAP, Ysance, Viant Technology and Eulerian Technologies.

Here are a few takeaways from the Quadrant.

Marketing Clouds Pull Away

As mentioned, Salesforce, Oracle and Adobe all separated themselves from the other vendors Gartner evaluated.

Frank noted two reasons: “We saw an advancement in the vision dimension with events like Salesforce acquiring [DMP and past Magic Quadrant participant] Krux and some acquisitions Oracle did.”

The other reason is that many of these marketing clouds are better integrated now. “The biggest change is a year’s worth of effort on the integration front and creating more seamless experiences for the marketer,” Frank said. “That’s solidified the value proposition of getting these components from a single source.”

Not that these companies don’t have room for improvement. Gartner noted that Adobe’s stack is overcomplicated at times and that the integration of Salesforce cloud components is still a “work in progress.”

Oracle also has integration issues, according to the Quadrant: “Oracle’s digital marketing hub product integration strategy must be applied to both Responsys and Eloqua, which means duplicate effort and uneven integration maturity.”

DSPs/DMPs Fall Back

Last year, Gartner qualified Turn, MediaMath and DataXu as visionaries – good strategy, but lacking the ability to execute. This year, that script has flipped. All three DSP/DMP hybrids found themselves in the challenger category, which means Gartner thinks they can execute but isn’t really enamored with their strategies.

Frank said pressures in the ad tech sector are forcing Turn, MediaMath and DataXu to choose between doubling down on their core advertising business or extending into adjacent areas, such as data management.

“These companies have, more often than not, focused on their core business,” Frank said. “They’ve scaled up their capabilities, worked on simplifying their UI, which has increased their ability to execute.”

But that decision means these vendors can no longer talk as aspirationally about being a complete solution for data-driven marketing across all channels.

New Players Push In

Two companies elbowed their way into more competitive spots. First, Nielsen went from a niche player to a challenger – and almost a leader. This growth was thanks to its acquisition of the eXelate DMP and the subsequent emergence of its marketing cloud product.

“Nielsen certainly has come a long way since it acquired eXelate and sought to integrate it into a marketing cloud that brought together the best of Nielsen data with eXelate’s programmatic niche,” Frank said.

Nielsen’s data ecosystem, processing capabilities and media measurement capabilities were all strengths. And its biggest weaknesses related to its marketing cloud being late to market compared to competitors, creating a limited track record of success. Also, clients gave mixed reviews to Nielsen Marketing Cloud.

The other surprise was the little-known Zeta Global, which improved in its ability to execute and completeness of vision. Last year, it was a niche player, but this year it is a visionary, according to Gartner.

“They are a bit of a stealth player, and they’re also a company that has done a lot of acquisitions over the last couple of years,” Frank said. “They don’t have a long history of building organically, but with the companies they’ve acquired, they’re assembling a puzzle that’s compelling.”

Zeta got big marks for value and client support, as well as for specific functions like cross-device management.


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The Trade Desk Passes $1 Billion In Platform Spend As Non-Display Products Gain Steam

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The Trade Desk broke the $1 billion mark in gross ad spend on its platform in 2016, generating $75 million in net profit, the company disclosed Thursday afternoon in its fourth quarter earnings report.

The demand-side platform (DSP) touted the growth of its omnichannel offerings. In 2016, display ad campaigns made up less than half of The Trade Desk’s revenue for the first time.

Mobile in-app and mobile video revenue grew about 400% and 300% respectively year-over-year, while native spending jumped 700% over the previous quarter.

Spending more than doubled from the previous quarter for The Trade Desk’s connected TV business. The category includes broadcasters’ digital streams, early-stage addressable, linear options like AT&T’s DirecTV Now and connected-TV platforms, such as Roku, Apple TV and Amazon Fire TV.

“Of all the numbers we’ve talked about, that’s the one I’m most excited about,” said Jeff Green, company founder and CEO.

Connected TV demand and supply is still limited so doubling that revenue is insignificant next to growth in native or mobile, but Green said that boosting engineering and account investments in addressable TV beyond the profitability of the category is “an important land grab we’re staking out right now.”

International expansion is also expected to weigh on The Trade Desk’s bottom line until the company’s footprint develops – and until international programmatic adoption takes off. Japan is the third biggest media market in the world, but only 5% of its media is programmatic.

Twenty percent of The Trade Desk’s staff is abroad, but international markets account for 10% of revenue. Green expects international markets to account for roughly 15% of revenue in 2017.

The DSP’s burst of head count and product investment will keep earnings at a plateau next year, even though gross spend on the platform is estimated to rise to $1.45 billion.

 

 


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